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What is BT Halo?

what is Bt halo BT Halo gives BT home broadband customers the opportunity to access premium features and services for an additional monthly fee. There are two versions of BT Halo available, with BT Halo 3 offering access to extras like tech expert visits while 3+ includes services like wi-fi boosters and a back-up 4G router. Pricing for BT Halo 3 starts from £1 per month, while the pricing for Halo 3+ could be up to £35 per month depending on which broadband package a customer chooses. BT Halo could be a valuable service for some customers who are wholly dependent on their home internet connection for work, but others may want to shop around and see if they can get the extras more cheaply elsewhere.

What is BT Halo?

BT Halo is a premium tier of BT broadband offering extra features and services to customers to improve their broadband connection, save them money on other services and maintain their wi-fi even if the home broadband is down. There are two tiers of BT Halo: 3 and 3+. Here's how they differ from each other: As we examine below, some of the features of BT Halo 3 are useful, although it's only when upgrading to the higher tier that customers get some truly innovative features.

Pricing

BT is notoriously vague about the actual pricing of their BT Halo service. As with all broadband providers, they frequently run special offers or at least offer deals in familiar formats (i.e., £37 or £36.99) that don't match the tariff guide on their website. They say Halo 3 can be added for as little as £1 per month for existing customers while they show personalised deals when customers select packages, encouraging them to upgrade their service to Halo 3+ before checkout. We did a little digging and looked at some deals for a potential new customer and an existing one. Here are two full fibre plans with home phone demonstrating the price differences for a new customer:

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